Kujachich Endowment

Peter N. Kujachich Endowment in Serbian and Montenegrin Studies

Endowment Description

Peter N. Kujachich, a native of California and a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley (Class of 1941), established the Peter N. Kujachich Endowment in Serbian and Montenegrin Studies in 1996. Mr. Kujachich's interest and devotion to Serbian history and culture was shared by his parents, who were Serbs from the Bay of Kotor and two of the many Serbs who came to Northern California long before the First World War.

The Kujachich Endowment supports, in perpetuity, activities at the University of California, Berkeley, that focus on the experience of the Serbian and Montenegrin peoples. Funds augment teaching and research at the university in such areas and disciplines as culture, literature, history, political science, music, fine arts, and language instruction. Supported activities include research (undergraduate, graduate, or faculty); classroom instruction; colloquia, symposia, and lecture series; publications; and creative thought and writing in the social sciences, humanities, and arts.

Grant Competition

A grant competition is held each spring, with a deadline in March. Eligibility is limited to faculty and/or student projects at the University of California, Berkeley, that focus on the experience of the Serbian and Montenegrin peoples. Proposals are submitted to the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, which administers the grant competition. Proposals must include a budget, a timeline, and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member. No electronic or faxed applications are accepted.

  • Deadline: TBA

Endowed Lectureships

A small portion of the Endowment is allotted yearly to the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies expressly for the purpose of holding an annual Peter N. Kujachich Endowed Lecture in Serbian and Montenegrin Studies.

Past lectures:

2001: Veljko Vujacic, professor of sociology, Oberlin College, The Rise and Fall of Milosevic.

2002: Susan Woodward, professor of political science, the Graduate Center, City University of New York, Nation-Building Under Western Eyes: The Balkans Today.

2003: Audrey Helfant-Budding, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Harvard University, Nation/People/Republic: Self-determination in Yugoslavia's Collapse.

2004: Ranko Bugarski, professor of English and general linguistics, University of Belgrade, What's in a Name? The Case of Serbo-Croatian.

2005: Robert M. Hayden, professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, Hagueiography: Uncritical Legal Studies of the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia.

2006: Lenard J. Cohen, professor, Department of Political Science, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Embracing Democracy: Political Change in Southeast Europe.

2007: Jasna Dragovic-Soso, Ph.D.Department of Politics, Goldsmiths College, University of London, Coming to Terms with the Recent Past: Intellectual Discourse and Public Polemics in Post-Milosevic Serbia

2008: Eric Gordy, Senior Lecturer and director of the Centre for Southeast European Studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies of University College, London. Narratives of Guild and Responsibility: Making Sense of Confronting the Past.

2009: Nick Miller, Professor of History, Department Chair, Boise State University. Where Was the Serbian Havel?

2010: Melissa Bokovoy,Associate Professor of History, Regents’ Lecturer, University of New Mexico. Remembering the Dead in Interwar Serbia, 1918-1941.

Projects Supported by the Kujachich Endowment